Simple Ways to Reduce Your Energy Usage

You have the power to reduce energy usage, and when you reduce demand, you cut the amount of resources, like coal and gas, needed to make energy—that means you create less greenhouse gas emissions, which keeps air cleaner for all of us…and saves on your utility bills!

The typical U.S. family spends about $1,900 a year on home utility bills? Unfortunately, a large portion of that energy is wasted. And each year, electricity generated by fossil fuels for a single home puts more carbon dioxide into the air than two average cars. And as for the road, transportation accounts for 67% of all U.S. oil consumption. The good news is that there is a lot you can do to save energy and money at home and in your car. Start making small changes today.

The key to achieving these savings in your home is a “whole-house” energy efficiency plan. To take a whole-house approach, view your home as an energy system with interdependent parts. For example, your heating system is not just a furnace—it’s a heat-delivery system that starts at the furnace and delivers heat throughout your home using a network of ducts. Even a top-of-the line, energy-efficient furnace will waste a lot of fuel if the ducts, walls, attic, windows, and doors are not properly sealed and insulated. Taking a whole-house approach to saving energy ensures that dollars you invest to save energy are spent wisely. Energy-efficient improvements not only make your home more comfortable, they can yield long-term financial rewards. Reduced utility bills more than make up for the higher price of energy-efficient appliances and improvements over their lifetimes. In addition, your home could bring in a higher price when you sell.

One simple way to improve your energy efficiency is installing an eco-friendly innovative and patented technology known as the “Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve”. It uses your existing water pipes and the thermal convection generated by your water heater to circulate the water back to your water heater for reheating (not requiring a pump or any electricity). To save energy and save water this “hot water recirculating systems has a temperature-controlled valve that allows the consumer to easily adjust the temperature to meet their particular needs. There is no water waste as it reduces the energy required to heat your water while it provides faster hot water to your all your faucets and showers for better water conservation. Installation is a simple 15-minute DIY project (no pipe cutting, soldering or electrical connections).

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What You Need To Know – Energy Use Statistics

The ability to heat and cool is one important accomplishment of modern technology. Our ovens, freezers, and homes can be kept at any temperature we choose, a luxury that wasn’t possible 100 years ago. But keeping our homes comfortable uses a lot of energy.

Lighting is also essential to a modern society. Lights have revolutionized the way we live, work, and play. Most homes still use the traditional incandescent bulbs invented by Thomas Edison. These bulbs convert only about 10% of the electricity they use into light; the other 90% is converted into heat. In 1879, the average bulb produced only 14 lumens (a measure of the quantity of light) per watt, compared to about 17 lumens per watt from modern incandescent bulbs. By adding halogen gases, the efficiency can be increased to 20 lumens per watt.

Compact fluorescent bulbs, or “CFLs,” have made inroads into home lighting systems in the last few years. These bulbs last much longer and use much less energy than incandescent bulbs, producing significant savings over the life of the bulb.

Appliances such as refrigerators, washing machines, and dryers are also more energy efficient than they used to be. Congress passed the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act in 1990 that requires new appliances to meet strict energy efficiency standards. Learn what it means to be energy efficient.

Natural gas is the most widely consumed energy source in American homes, followed by electricity, heating oil, and propane. Natural gas and heating oil (fuel oil) are used mainly for home heating. Electricity may also be used for heating and cooling, plus it lights our homes and runs almost all of our appliances including refrigerators, toasters, and computers. Many homes in rural areas use propane for heating, while others use it to fuel their barbecue grills.

About 80% of residential energy use is consumed in single-family homes, while 15% is consumed in multi-family dwellings such as apartments, and 5% is consumed in mobile homes.

More than half of the energy used for heating in single-family homes (either attached or detached) is natural gas, about one-fourth is electricity, and one-tenth is fuel oil (heating oil). Most single-family homes have some type of air conditioning, and almost all single-family homes have a washing machine and a dryer.

Single-family main fuel used for heating and operating equipment:

56% use natural gas

26% use electricity

7% use fuel oil

6% use liquefied petroleum gases (LPG)

1% use kerosene

Eighty-four percent of single-family homes have air conditioning (central system, wall/window units, or both).

95% have a clothes washer

92% have a clothes dryer

74% have a personal computer

Multi-family dwellings such as apartments use about equal amounts of natural gas and electricity for heating. More than 80% of multi-family homes have air conditioning and more than one-third contain washers and dryers.

47% use natural gas

41% use electricity

7% use fuel oil

almost no one uses LPG or kerosene

Eighty-two percent of multi-family homes have air conditioning (a central system, wall/window units, or both).

40% have a clothes washer

35% have a clothes dryer

55% have a personal computer

Mobile Homes main heating fuel and equipment:

27% use natural gas

42% use electricity

3% use fuel oil

19% use LPG

4% use kerosene

Eighty-four percent of mobile homes have air conditioning (central system, wall/window units, or both).

87% have a clothes washer

78% have a clothes dryer

49% have a personal computer

Gains in Home Energy Efficiency Offset by More Electronics and Appliances

Total residential energy consumption rose approximately 13% over the past quarter century. This was lower than both the rate of population growth (+24%) and new housing starts (+36%) due to energy efficiency improvements in heating and cooling equipment, water heaters, and major appliances. Efficiency gains were offset by increases in the number of homes with clothes washers, dryers, and dishwashers. Additionally, a growing number of U.S. households now have multiple televisions, computers, and refrigerators.

The percentage of homes with central air-conditioning has more than doubled since 1980, with nearly 60% of homes having a central system. All areas of the United States show a significant increase in air-conditioning equipment and use in recent years. Cooling now accounts for 8% of total residential energy consumption in the United States, double its 1980 share.

You can reduce your energy usage by installing an innovative eco-friendly and patented technology known as the “Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve”. It uses your existing water pipes and the thermal convection generated by your water heater to circulate the water back to your water heater for reheating (not requiring a pump or any electricity). These hot water re-circulation systems have a temperature-controlled valve that allows the consumer to easily adjust the temperature to meet their particular needs. To save water and save energy here is no water waste as it reduces the energy required to heat your water while it provides faster hot water to your faucets and showers for better water conservation. Installation is a simple 15-minute DIY project (no pipe cutting, soldering or electrical connections).

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Utility Bills In Hot Water?

Water heating is the third largest energy expense in your home. It typically accounts for about 12% of your utility bill. There are four ways to cut your water heating bills: use less hot water, turn down the thermostat on your water heater, insulate your water heater, install simple new technology that reduces your energy cost.

  • Install aerating, low-flow faucets and showerheads.
  • Repair leaky faucets promptly; a leaky faucet wastes gallons of water in a short period of time.
  • Lower the thermostat on your water heater; water heaters sometimes come from the factory with high temperature settings, but a setting of 120°F provides comfortable hot water for most uses.
  • Insulate your electric hot-water storage tank, but be careful not to cover the thermostat. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Insulate your natural gas or oil hot-water storage tank, but be careful not to cover the water heater’s top, bottom, thermostat, or burner compartment. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations; when in doubt, get professional help.
  • Insulate the first 6 feet of the hot and cold water pipes connected to the water heater.
  • If you are in the market for a new dishwasher or clothes washer, consider buying an efficient, water-saving ENERGY STAR model to reduce hot water use.
  • Install innovative eco-friendly and patented technology is known as the “Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve”. It uses your existing water heater and water pipes. The thermal convection generated by your water heater to circulate the water back to your water heater for reheating (not requiring a pump or any electricity). These hot water re-circulation systems have a temperature-controlled valve that allows the consumer to easily adjust the temperature to meet their particular needs. To save water and save energy, there is no water waste as it reduces the energy required to heat your water while it provides instant hot water to your faucets and showers for better water conservation. Installation is a simple 15-minute DIY project (no pipe cutting, soldering or electrical connections).
  • Drain a quart of water from your water tank every 3 months to remove sediment that impedes heat transfer and lowers the efficiency of your heater. The type of water tank you have determines the steps to take, so follow the manufacturer’s advice.
  • Although most water heaters last 10–15 years, it’s best to start shopping now for a new one if yours is more than 7 years old. Doing some research before your heater fails will enable you to select one that most appropriately meets your needs.
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Saving Energy Is Getting Easier!

Many environmental savvy consumers are learning how to conserve energy – how to make thoughtful choices about ways use less energy. We all realize how important it is to not waste energy.

Using high energy demands at “off peak” times will help in balancing overall power consumption on the electrical distribution grid (so as not to over burden the grid system which may create electrical black out periods).

Don’t leave lights on when no one is in the room. If you are going to be out of the room for more than five minutes, turn off the light. If you know of a light that everyone forgets to turn off, make a sticker or a sign to hang next to the switch that says “Lights Out!” or “Don’t Forget!” Where possible, use fluorescent light bulbs. Those funny-looking bulbs produce the same amount of light by using 1/4 of the electricity. Plus, they last for years and years without burning out.

Turn off the TV when no one is watching it. The same goes for computers, radios and stereos – if no one using it, turn it off. Turn off all the appliances at the surge protector/control strip – that four- or six-plug extension chord that you plug all your computer things into. Some devices, like modems or other networking boxes are drawing small amounts of power all the time.

In warm weather (when using air conditioning), set the thermostat to at least 78 F degrees. (Don’t do this, of course, if it will cause health problems for anyone in your family.) When no one is home, set the thermostat at 85 degrees. That way, you’ll reduce the need for air conditioning and you will save energy. If you have ceiling fans or other fans, turn them on. The blowing air can make you feel 5 degrees cooler, without running the family’s air conditioner. Fans use a lot less electricity than air conditioners!

In cold weather, wear warm clothing and set your thermostat no higher than 68 F degrees (health permitting). When you go to sleep at night, set the thermostat even cooler. When you leave home for an extended time, set the thermostat at 55 degrees. That way, your family can save from 5 percent to 20 percent on your heating costs.

Americans tend to use much more energy than necessary to heat their homes. That accounts for a lot of wasted energy! If you have a fireplace, close the damper when you don’t have a fire burning. An open fireplace damper can let 8 percent of heat from your furnace escape through the chimney! In the summer, an open fireplace damper can let cool air escape. It’s like having a window open!

Make a map of your home, and mark all the windows, heating vents, and outside doors. Take a ribbon and hold it up to the edges of the doors and windows. If the ribbon blows, you’ve found a leak! Seal the leak with caulk or weather stripping.

Think about your curtains. Keeping the curtains closed on cold, cloudy days helps block the cold outside air from getting inside. Also, keeping the curtains closed on very hot days keeps the hot air out!

Turn off your electric blanket when you aren’t in bed.

Wasting water wastes energy. Why? Because the biggest use of electricity in most cities is supplying water and cleaning it up after it’s been used!

About 75 percent of the water we use in our homes is used in the bathroom. Unless you have a low flush toilet, for example, you use about five gallons to seven gallons of water with every flush! A leaky toilet can waste more than 10,000 gallons of water a year.

Drippy faucets are bad, too. A faucet that leaks enough water to fill a soda bottle every 30 minutes will waste 2,192 gallons of water a year.

For better conservation to save energy and save water Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valves are eco-friendly and designed to eliminate the wait for hot water and conserve that wasted water (which would normally be ran down the drain). Hot water re-circulation systems keep a constant supply of hot water in the pipes, circulating the water back to the water heater for reheating. This allows the consumer to have faster hot water whenever it is needed without the wait or waste. This not only saves the energy required to heat ground temperature water (replacing the wasted water down-the-drain), it also saves the average family up to 17,000 gallons of water a year.

Another simple way to save water and energy is to take shorter showers. You’ll use less hot water – and water heaters account for nearly 1/4 of your home’s energy use.

A load of dishes cleaned in a dishwasher uses 37 percent less water than washing dishes by hand! However, if you fill up one side of the sink with soapy water and the other side with rinse water – and if you don’t let the faucet run – you’ll use half as much water as a dishwasher does. Doing the dishes this way can save enough water for a five-minute shower!

If you need to warm up or defrost small amounts of food, use a microwave instead of the stove to save energy. Microwave ovens use around 50 percent less energy than conventional ovens do. For large meals, however, the stove is usually more efficient. In the summer, using a microwave causes less heat in the kitchen, which saves money on air conditioning.

Don’t keep the refrigerator door open any longer than you need to. Close it to keep the cold air inside! Also, make sure the door closes securely. There is a rubber-like seal around the door that you can test. Just close the door on a dollar bill, and then see how easy it is to pull out. If the dollar slides out easily, the door is probably leaking cold air from inside.

Is there an old refrigerator sitting in the garage or someplace else at home? Old refrigerators are real energy hogs! An old refrigerator could be costing your family as much as $120 a year to operate. Remove it or replace it with an energy efficient model…one large refrigerator is cheaper to run than two smaller ones.

Remember saving water saves energy. Use a broom instead of a hose to clean off the driveway, patio or deck – this will save hundreds of gallons of water each year.

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Three of the Easiest Ways To Prevent Pipe Freezing

As the Winter approaches, our homes and properties including our plumbing become subject to exposure of harsh elements. Its these harsh elements and lack of maintenance that usually cause emergencies in our homes. Freezing pipes and related problems are caused by water within the pipe freezing and then expanding inside the pipe, causing it to burst.

Like all emergencies, bursting of frozen pipes rarely come at a convenient time and is usually a disaster we find in the morning after the freezing nights in our robe and slippers, yes even before coffee. Freezing pipes not only cause headaches but usually result in property damage, loss of massive amounts of water (enough to fill a small pool in a day!) and if gone unnoticed mold and mildew creating uninhabitable situations.

The good news is there are a few different ways to help prevent freezing:

1. Insulation of exposed piping:

Using wrapping on exposed piping can reduce the chance of your most exposed piping freezing and bursting. There are many types of wrapping that can be used (usually available at any hardware store).

2. Backflow Prevention Devices:

Backflows are a common place for bursting to occur since they are usually very exposed to the elements. Backflow freeze protection bags are available for a nominal cost.

3. Water Movement:

Any water that can be moved makes freezing in your pipes that much less likely. So waking up to get a glass of water in the middle of the night can actually prevent a bit more than dehydration. Also flushing the toilet can do the same. Some people have had their hose bibs open just enough to get a drip every few seconds and this can help water move continually.

New innovative eco-friendly technology offered by the Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is easy to install (not requiring pipe cutting or electrical wiring) and a great pipe freezing prevention aid. Installed at the plumbing fixture at the end of the “at risk plumbing run” (pipes most likely to freeze), will allow water to flow from your water heater-through the existing hot water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”-to the re-circulation valve. From the hot water re-circulation valve the water will continue back to the water heater (for reheating)-through the cold water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”. To save hot water the system contains a sensor, which only opens the valve when the water temperature drops below the adjustable temperature setting. This open loop of water circulation keeps temped water circulating through the “at risk plumbing run” without wasting water while also providing faster hot water for better water conservation (to save water and save energy).

These are a few different ways your customers can have a little piece of mind this winter and hopefully save money and time! Remember the main ideas are to protect exposed piping and to keep water moving as often as possible.

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Why Chose This New Hot Water Recirculation Valve?

  • ECO-FRIENDLY – REQUIRES NO ELECTRICITY TO OPERATE
  • SAVES TIME / FRUSTRATIONS / NO MORE DRAINING WATER LINES IN WINTER CABINS
  • ALLOWS HOMES OWNERS TO “DIAL DOWN” THEIR THERMOSTATS WHEN NOT AT HOME (REDUCING THE RISK OF PIPES FREEZING) = LOWER HEATING BILLS
  • AIDS IN PROTECTING PIPES HIDDEN IN WALLS, FLOORS, ATTICS, CRAWLSPACES AND ETC. FROM FREEZING
  • EASY DIY INSTALLATION COMPARED TO HEAT TAPE OR PUMP SYSTEMS
  • NO BLOWN-OUT FUSE’S (EVEN WORKS DURING POWER OUTAGES)
  • HIGH ANNUAL WATER SAVINGS (UP TO 17,000 GALLONS PER YEAR FOR THE AVERAGE FAMILY)
  • NO MORE WAITING FOR HOT WATER
  • REDUCED SEPTIC SYSTEM MAINTENANCE / UPKEEP / COST
  • REBATES FROM UTILITY COMPANIES

This new innovative technology offered by the Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is easy to install (not requiring pipe cutting or electrical wiring) and a great pipe freezing prevention aid. Installed at the plumbing fixture at the end of the “at risk plumbing run” (pipes most likely to freeze), will allow water to flow from your water heater-through the existing hot water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”-to the re-circulation valve. From the hot water re-circulation valve the water will continue back to the water heater (for reheating)-through the cold water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”. To save hot water the system contains a sensor, which opens the valve only when the water temperature drops below the adjustable temperature setting. This open loop of hot water re-circulation keeps temped water circulating through the “at risk plumbing run” without wasting water while also providing Instant hot water (saving water and saving energy).

How To Prevent Pipes From Freezing

If you’ve ever had the misfortune of having a water pipe freeze and burst, you know first hand about what a devastating impact it can have on your home. The broken pipe itself is actually relatively minor, but the damage caused by the leaking water running through your walls and ceiling can mean a major reconstruction project, requiring replacing drywall, ceilings and maybe even furniture and appliances. Here are some ways to make sure you never have to go through that hassle.

1. Plan ahead and figure out which pipes could potentially freeze. Water pipes running through unheated crawl spaces and pipes running through walls to the outside are prime candidates for freezing.

2. Turn off the water supply lines running to your outside taps before the cold weather arrives. There is usually a shut off valve in the water supply line close to where it goes through the outside wall. Once the water is shut off inside, go outside and open the outside taps as well. This will drain any water remaining in the pipe or in the tap, so there’s nothing to freeze.

3. Check any pipes that run close to outside walls. Put some insulation between the pipe and the wall to help keep the cold away from the pipe.

4. Insulate any pipes that run through unheated crawl spaces. Wrap them with insulation and tape or put preformed pipe sleeve insulation along the pipes, then tape the sleeves in place.

5. Install electrical heating tape (available at home stores) on any pipes that run through areas that get really cold, like garages.

6. OR, simply an innovative and patented technology known as a “temperature controlled hot water recirculating valve” (it’s a breeze to install-no pipe cutting, soldering or electrical connections). It uses your existing water pipes and the thermal convection generated by your water heater to keep water circulating back to your water heater for reheating (not requiring a pump or any electricity). Warm circulating water will not freeze. These systems are temperature-controlled and are easily adjustable to meet your particular temperature needs. There is no water waste and it also reduces the energy required to heat your water while it provides instant hot water to your faucets and showers.

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Prepare Your Plumbing Now Before Freezing Weather Hits Again

There are several simple remedies to keep water pipes from freezing when the weather turns severely cold, as well as several remedies that can be costly.

Here are ways to keep pipes from freezing:

1. Leave the cabinet doors under the kitchen sink open so that the room air can warm the pipes.

2. Place a lamp with a 60-watt bulb in the potential problem area to warm the walls and pipes. Make sure there are no combustible materials near the bulb.

3. With rigid foam insulation, close and seal all foundation vents that are near water pipes.

4. Insulate the foundation walls and the ends of the floor joists with rigid foam insulation.

5. If the crawl access is inside the home, set a fan in the opening to blow warm air from the home to the foundation. Don’t use a fan when the access is in an unheated garage or outside the home.

6. If the water pipes are freezing inside the exterior wall, cut an opening in the wall to expose the pipes to the home’s warm air. Place fiberglass insulation behind the pipes, between the pipes and the home’s exterior wall. The hole in the wall can be covered later with a hinged door or a panel that can be removed during cold spells.

7. Have the home’s exterior walls insulated. Caulk and seal around doors, windows, house faucets and outside outlets.

8. There is also new eco-friendly innovative technology on the market that is easy to install (not requiring pipe cutting or electrical wiring) and a great pipe freezing prevention aid. The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a temperature controlled thermal convection powered hot water re-circulation valve installed at the plumbing fixture at the end of the “at risk plumbing run” (pipes most likely to freeze), will allow water to flow from your water heater-through the existing hot water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”-to the re-circulation valve. From the hot water re-circulation valve the water will continue back to the water heater (for reheating)-through the cold water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”. To save hot water the system contains a sensor, which opens the valve only when the water temperature drops below the adjustable temperature setting. This open loop of water circulation keeps temped water circulating through the “at risk plumbing run” without wasting water while also providing instant hot water to all your fixtures to save water and save energy.

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Modern Ways To Prevent Pipe Freeze

There are now a number of modern technologies that can be used to help prevent plumbing pipe freezing. Good thing these innovative gadgets were invented, at least homeowners will not have to worry about costly damages caused by ruptured frozen pipes. Ice Lock is one amazing and interesting new product that is getting a lot of great reviews recently (although a little pricey). It is a kind of specialized foam tube that compresses when ice starts to expand. When placed inside the problem pipes, this can help prevent pipe rupturing. This is possible by creating sufficient space within the frozen pipe as the tube compresses thus minimizing the chance of bursting. Another great innovation that can give you an early warning about the possibility of pipe freezing is a product called IP thermostat. This wonderful pipe freezing detection device enables homeowner to control the heat settings of their home via the internet. The device will generate email alarm notifications and critical alerts if the temperature starts dropping near freezing point. Doing so will allow homeowners to promptly avert major damages that can be caused by ruptured frozen plumbing pipes.

New eco-friendly innovative technology offered by the Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is easy to install (not requiring pipe cutting or electrical wiring) and a great pipe freezing prevention aid. Installed at the plumbing fixture at the end of the “at risk plumbing run” (pipes most likely to freeze), will allow water to flow from your water heater-through the existing hot water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”-to the re-circulation valve. From the hot water re-circulation valve the water will continue back to the water heater (for reheating)-through the cold water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”. To save hot water the system contains a sensor, which opens the valve only when the water temperature drops below the adjustable temperature setting. This open loop of water circulation keeps temped water circulating through the “at risk plumbing run” providing water conservation and faster hot water to all your fixtures, which saves water and saves energy.

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Saving Yourself From Frozen Pipes This Winter

In colder climates, there’s always a chance your customer’s pipes could freeze. And frozen pipes may burst, causing serious water damage to the home. Frozen pipes can be inconvenient and a frozen water pipe is prone to bursting, which can cause costly water damage inside the home. Therefore, it’s important to prevent pipes from freezing with a bit of seasonal home maintenance.

Tending to the home’s water pipes should be on every resident’s home winterizing checklist. Consider the following ways to prevent pipes from freezing and bursting during the cold winter months.

Identify Which Pipes that are Likely to Freeze. Certain pipes and certain sections of piping are more likely to freeze than others. Pipes that run along exterior walls of the house are more apt to freeze, particularly in an older home, where the walls may not be insulated.

Pipes that run through attic crawlspaces, garages and the basement are also prone to freezing. Homeowners should also pay attention to the area where the main water supply pipe enters the home, as this area is especially prone to freezing.

It’s also important to remember that hot water pipes can freeze; it’s not just cold water pipes that must be winterized. And the air around the pipe does not need to be 32 degrees or colder; the cold travels up the pipe, allowing the water inside to freeze, causing an ice blockage and a potential pipe burst.

Insulate Water Pipes, Especially Pipes That Are Likely to Freeze. Purchase and install pipe insulation – foam tubes that can be fitted around each pipe inside the home. Pipe insulators will help to keep pipes warm, making it less likely that the pipes will freeze.

In areas that are especially prone to freezing pipes, wrap the pipes with electric heating tape, available at most home supply stores and hardware stores.

For pipes that run along exterior walls, it’s also prudent to place fiberglass insulation between the pipe and the exterior wall for added protection from cold. Extra insulation should be placed around the section of piping at the point where the water supply enters the home, as these pipes tend to freeze at a much faster rate since the cold will travel from the outdoors and along the interior pipes.

On extremely cold days, homeowners should take extra precautions to prevent pipes from freezing. One way to prevent pipes from freezing is to keep the water moving through the pipes. To keep water flowing through pipes to avoid freezing, leave several faucets turned on, with a flow that’s just slightly more than a heavy drip. It’s important to leave several different faucets running, as sections of piping can freeze, cutting off the water supply to entire sections of the home (i.e. the entire second floor). Leaving several faucets running will also pull in more water though the main pipe running into the home – the pipe that is most likely to freeze in many homes.

There is also new eco-friendly innovative technology on the market to prevent pipe freeze that is easy to install (not requiring pipe cutting or electrical wiring) and provides instant hot water. A temperature controlled thermal convection powered hot water re-circulation valve installed at the plumbing fixture at the end of the “at risk plumbing run” (pipes most likely to freeze). The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve will allow water to flow from your water heater-through the existing hot water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”-to the re-circulation valve. From the hot water re-circulation valve the water will continue back to the water heater (for reheating)-through the cold water pipe in the “at risk plumbing run”. To save hot water the system contains a sensor, which opens the valve only when the water temperature drops below the adjustable temperature setting. This open loop of water circulation keeps temped water circulating through the “at risk plumbing run” without wasting water.

In addition, if a home loses heat for any reason (or in the case of a seasonal home), it’s important to drain the water pipes in the home to prevent the pipes from freezing and bursting. Pipes will burst as a result of the expansion that occurs when water freezes into ice.

Draining the water from a home’s pipes is simple: turn off the home’s water supply using the main valve, usually located at the point where the water supply enters the home. Then, run all of the home’s faucets and showers until the water stops flowing.

Homeowners can also prevent pipes from freezing and bursting by draining the pipes that feed exterior water spigots. Similarly, turn off the valve that supplies water to the outdoor water spigots and open the spigot and let all of the water flow out of the pipes. This should be done in fall, during the home winterizing process.

Prevent Your Pipes From Freezing:

The best solution to preventing your pipes from freezing is to simply install innovative and patented technology known as a “temperature controlled hot water recirculating valve” (is a breeze-no pipe cutting, soldering or electrical connections). It uses your existing water pipes and the thermal convection generated by your water heater to circulate the water back to your water heater for reheating (not requiring a pump or any electricity). These systems are temperature-controlled and are easily adjustable to meet your particular temperature needs. There is no water waste and it also reduces the energy required to heat your water while it provides instant hot water to your faucets and showers. A trickle of water circulating in your pipes will keep your pipes from freezing in most circumstances.

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Water Saving Products With the Best Return

(not listed in any particular order)

  • Washer-less Faucets: Replacing your “old style” rubber washer sealed valve with a washer-less type valve means never having to change a leaky rubber washer again.
  • Sensor Faucets: Replacing your manually operated faucets with an infra-red no-touch sensor type faucet, insures water will only flow when the faucet in use.
  • Waterless Urinals: Replacing water-flush urinals with a waterless urinal that use liquid sealant lighter than water and uses gravity to wash urine over the trap and down the drain rather than water can save thousands of gallon of water each month.
  • Hot Water Re-circulation Valves: Installing an eco-friendly Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. Faster hot water also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.
  • Electronic Leak Detection: Installing leak detection and monitoring systems throughout the plumbing system can continuously monitor leaks and water usage to evaluate ways to economize water usage.
  • Temperature Activated Shower Nozzles: Installing temperature activated shower nozzle technology will slow the water flow to a trickle when your away from the shower and the water temperature reaches a comfortable 95 degrees. Now, your hot water isn’t running down the drain while you’re away from the shower.
  • Install a temperature controlled hot water re-circulation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a simple DIY plumbing installation (no water pump required) and can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.
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